DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20193425

Action research arm test as a tool for assessment of motor recovery in patients with stroke: a critical review

Sukanya Parag Dandekar, Suvarna Ganvir

Abstract


 Action research arm test has been used widely clinically for the assessment of upper extremity function post stroke and in various other conditions. Measurement of recovery after stroke is becoming increasingly important with the advent of new treatment options under investigation in stroke rehabilitation research. The Action Research Arm Test scale was developed as the first quantitative evaluative instrument for measuring motor stroke recovery, based on a upper extremity test by Lyle. It is a well-designed, feasible and efficient clinical examination method that has been tested widely in the stroke population. Excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and construct validity have been demonstrated. Limitations of the motor domain include a ceiling effect. Further study should test performance of this scale in specific subgroups of stroke patients and better define its criterion validity, sensitivity to change, and minimal clinically important difference. Based on the available evidence, the Action Research Arm Test is recommended highly as a clinical and research tool for evaluating changes in motor impairment following stroke.


Keywords


Scales, Stroke recovery, Upper Extremity

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References


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